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Working on a translucent model,


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I wouldn't scrape it with a knife unless you want to tear it up. I once used fingernail polish remover (acetone) on a piece of soft cloth. You really only want a little as you don't want the remover to stay on the plastic in any quantity. It will melt it if this happens. However, if you have a small amount on the cloth and rub gently but quickly (insert joke here), the tampo will come off and leave a smooth undamaged surface. Then wash off with a little water to remove any possibility of left over acetone. Good luck.

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Testors Acryl Dried Paint Remover

Use this stuff. Sparingly. Dip the corner of a kitchen cleaning sponge or Q-tip into the solvent, gently rub the area you're trying to remove paint from, rinse with water, and repeat. Most of all, be patient, it will take several passes to loosen up the tampo.

It shouldn't cloud your plastic, but be careful, it will melt/degrade the parts if you leave it on too long. Take special care on the knee joints; I've broken a couple trying to do this.

Edited by Lobsterman
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I had never heard of Goo Gone for removing tampos. I believe Goo Gone is a form of Naptha which is very mild and good for dissolving adhesives, but not paint. Using an Acetone base is good, but will melt plastic if the contact is too great for too long.

I have used many chemical finishes and solvents over the years. I am a master carpenter and restoring museum quality antiquities was my profession for about 8 years while I attended university. I still do cabinet work in my garage when time allows. Hurricane Katrina left me with a few still untouched projects.

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I had never heard of Goo Gone for removing tampos. I believe Goo Gone is a form of Naptha which is very mild and good for dissolving adhesives, but not paint. Using an Acetone base is good, but will melt plastic if the contact is too great for too long.

I have used many chemical finishes and solvents over the years. I am a master carpenter and restoring museum quality antiquities was my profession for about 8 years while I attended university. I still do cabinet work in my garage when time allows. Hurricane Katrina left me with a few still untouched projects.

I was a master printer & every day for most of my career I worked in an environment which was thick with MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) .....similar to acetone but stronger .

I am 59 ....I am surprised I am alive .

Not kidding .

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I understand your concern. I worked with keytones, as well and never with great ventilation or proper protection. I am now paying a price for that in the form of respiratory issues. My brother ran a print shop for years and even had his own for a time. Those chemicals would make you loopy.

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Refers to how the graphics are applied.

And as for taking the paint off, I use Acetone and a cloth and just work quickly.

This is basically what I do, but much better explained. :) (I so wanted to post "thats what she said")

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I had never heard of Goo Gone for removing tampos. I believe Goo Gone is a form of Naptha which is very mild and good for dissolving adhesives, but not paint. Using an Acetone base is good, but will melt plastic if the contact is too great for too long.

I have used many chemical finishes and solvents over the years. I am a master carpenter and restoring museum quality antiquities was my profession for about 8 years while I attended university. I still do cabinet work in my garage when time allows. Hurricane Katrina left me with a few still untouched projects.

I was a master printer & every day for most of my career I worked in an environment which was thick with MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) .....similar to acetone but stronger .

I am 59 ....I am surprised I am alive .

Not kidding .

Yikes! MEK is no joke. Up until last year, I had been working with chromium based paints (very nasty stuff) painting CH-47's & V-22's. There was one paint we'd use that needed to be mixed with MEK, depending on the air conditions (temp, and humidity played a big factor) can't get into it too much, but I'm glad to not be doing that now, and sitting at a desk for the first time in my life. we also used a lot of acetone, and desoclean for thinning and mixing and cleaning the paints/hoses/pressure pots.

Back on topic... I have used I have used the same can of goof off my entire minimate customizing career, works good. my only trick is to wet the rag, and rub the part on the rag, instead of rubbing the part on the rag (if that makes sense). I don't know why, but it seems to work better for me that way.

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