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Fantastic Four Movie... Reboot?


NorthRaider
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One of the Storms is adopted, I assume, or they're part of a blended family.

That's really not a problem with me. I'm having trouble with the skinny guy playing Ben Grimm.

Who's playing Mole Man? I can't see them taking another stab at Doom. I think they'll pull a Batman Begins or Amazing Spider-Man and focus on a never-before-seen-on-the-silver-screen villain and keep Victor for a later movie. (Assuming this one doesn't bomb like I hope it will so Marvel can get rights back…)

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The only thing i really question is the ages of the actors in these roles.I've always seen Reed as a man in his late 40's. And Sue, being his wife, put her within about 10 years of that.

I thought Sue & Reed were a little too young in the last 2 films to come out. These guys are even younger!

Still - i'll hold off on judgement till i see it, but i don't know how this is going to feel like the 'First Family of comics' without an appropriately ages patriarch and matriarch.

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The Johnny/Sue thing is such an...unnecessary angle to add. As much as i love Kate Mara, at that point they should have just cast a black actress for Sue too.

Love Miles Teller and i get a serious Ultimate Reed vibe from him, so that'll be great. He can definitely carry the movie if he has to. Never heard of Jamie Bell. I'm iffy on this. It feels like a quick grab to keep the license like ASM for Sony, but i just don't have any concrete feelings yet.

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The Johnny/Sue thing is such an...unnecessary angle to add. As much as i love Kate Mara, at that point they should have just cast a black actress for Sue too.

Love Miles Teller and i get a serious Ultimate Reed vibe from him, so that'll be great. He can definitely carry the movie if he has to. Never heard of Jamie Bell. I'm iffy on this. It feels like a quick grab to keep the license like ASM for Sony, but i just don't have any concrete feelings yet.

Jamie Bell was Tintin in Adventures of Tintin. He was also the young man reading Heart of Darkness in Peter Jackson's King Kong. Also the other jumper in Jumper if you remember that movie.

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Miles and Michael are both amazing actors who will surely do a great job. If Kate Mara is anything like her sister she will be serviceable. The one casting that kind of threw me off was Jamie Bell; He is a good actor but like everyone else I am not sure if he could pull off Ben.

Josh Trank, Miles Teller and Michael B Jordan are all great in my books, so I will definitely give the film a shot, it certainly can't be as bad as the previous 2....

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Once upon a time I was excited about this movie, but I don't think any of these casting choices make sense. Disregarding the race thing, which I think is a totally unnecessary change, I just can't imagine either Kate or Jamie in their respective roles. I like both actors, but this just seems to be a serious case of miscasting. Is it just me or would Dean Norris (Breaking Bad, Under The Dome) have been the perfect choice for Ben Grimm/Thing?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I agree with the bulk of what he says, as well. FF is one of my favorite teams and comics ever, so the previous films make me incredibly sad. The "fantastic" part of the name has a meaning to the characters and story, and I think Marvel Studios would understand that and play that up. This director made some snarky comments to the effect of "Reed Richards won't be a 'stretchy guy,'" and I think that's totally the wrong attitude--one that fits in with this guy's history of apparently eschewing the colorful and "fantastic" nature of comic-accurate costumes. I also agree that Thor 2 might be the best Marvel movie to date!

Edited by karamazov80
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IDK, maybe it's cause I never read a FF comic in my life, but I actually enjoyed the last 2 movies. They were fun. Especially FF:RotSS (dumb name) I enjoyed that one a LOT more than FF1. I kinda wish they'd just gone ahead and made FF3. Although I know everyone wants FF looking into the Chitari/kree/skrull/GotG, so we're all losing out on that one.

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I kinda wish they'd just gone ahead and made FF3.

HnnhB88.png

Politician likes TM2 Dinobot's post.

We're in agreement about this and trying to salvage the Spider-Man movies. It felt like something had already been built and there was a good cast of characters and they just threw it all away.

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I can't be objective since I've probably read hundreds of FF comics over the years, and two long runs (Lee/Kirby and John Byrne) are among my favorite comic runs ever of any kind. But, those films were far from fun for me. I thought Evans and Chiklis (and Fishburne I guess) were good casting, but that's about where my appreciation ends. Admitting up front that I only paid attention to bits and pieces of FF2 when we rented it--I thought the stories overall were lazy and predictable, the characters were simplistic, unrealistic, and unlikable, the interactions between the characters felt artificial and tedious (with an exception for Evans and Chiklis), the humor wasn't humorous, the villains weren't appropriately menacing, the movies didn't know how to build tension or provide a satisfying payoff. And these are all generic criticisms having nothing to do with the source material. From that POV, Reed (the most important member of the FF) and Doom (the most important villain of the FF) were totally miscast and badly written. But more importantly, the spirit of the comics was not captured. That was my major problem with Man of Steel, and my second biggest problem with FF, after the simple fact that I think they were just badly made movies.

Having said all that, I do appreciate that the creative team was willing to treat those films with a level of frivolity that the franchise needs. I just wish they had better filmmaking ability, taste, a better sense of humor, and a better understanding of what made the source material special in the process.

Edited by karamazov80
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I can't be objective since I've probably read hundreds of FF comics over the years, and two long runs (Lee/Kirby and John Byrne) are among my favorite comic runs ever of any kind. But, those films were far from fun for me. I thought Evans and Chiklis (and Fishburne I guess) were good casting, but that's about where my appreciation ends. Admitting up front that I only paid attention to bits and pieces of FF2 when we rented it--I thought the stories overall were lazy and predictable, the characters were simplistic, unrealistic, and unlikable, the interactions between the characters felt artificial and tedious (with an exception for Evans and Chiklis), the humor wasn't humorous, the villains weren't appropriately menacing, the movies didn't know how to build tension or provide a satisfying payoff. And these are all generic criticisms having nothing to do with the source material. From that POV, Reed (the most important member of the FF) and Doom (the most important villain of the FF) were totally miscast and badly written. But more importantly, the spirit of the comics was not captured. That was my major problem with Man of Steel, and my second biggest problem with FF, after the simple fact that I think they were just badly made movies.

I would be willing, as someone who doesn't read FF, to say the same things about the comics. I would guess that many people, myself included, look at them as relics of a bygone era, a Lost in Space type story where the humor is ham fisted, the characters are both unrelateable and unlikable, the main villain is a melodrama reject and the team lead is a boring, one note, old guy who has no personality.

Again, I haven't read the comics, and you have a love for them that I do not, so there must be something there. But from my view point, which a lot of people must hold, including Hollywood people, it is easy to see how a FF movie has never been a success, let alone done "right." It is a hard sell.

Edited by TM2 Dinobot
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How can you possibly have an opinion of the content of the comics (the characters are unlikeable and relics, ect) when you admit that you haven't read them? Dunno.gif

I do agree, though, that the points you raise are common misconceptions about the FF. And you can probably say that the old Lee-Kirby stuff is dated... but it's fifty years old. There are plenty of modern examples of the FF working just fine, thanks, notably Johnathan Hickman's very recent run. The FF is a very unique concept in comics, and when it's done right (or, better put, when creators that understand what makes the FF unique work on the title), the results can be great. When a guy like, say, Mark Millar gets ahold of them, or the guys that made the FF movies, the results... not so great.

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the thing is, you cant look as the comics as relics, because like EVERY OTHER SUPERHERO EVER, the comics have gone through thousands of iterations and the core theme of them is "a family who sticks together, has powers, and explores the unknown" and not to over simplify it but The Incredibles used the same basic foundation and Pixar ended up with a critically acclaimed superhero movie.

Im eager to see what this film will look like, if it follows a similar method to the Spiderman reboot, ill be happy

also I love Michael B Jordan as an actor and hes extremely charismatic, so im excited to see him play Johnny.

Lastly, yes FF would fit so perfectly into the MCU its sad, but hopefully this will mean the writers will up the ante and make this a great series in its own right

im also not sure how you can say Doctor Doom is a hard to sell character as hes appeared in probably every marvel franchise to ever exist (other than the MCU)

Edited by undeadpool
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How can you possibly have an opinion of the content of the comics (the characters are unlikeable and relics, ect) when you admit that you haven't read them? Dunno.gif

I do agree, though, that the points you raise are common misconceptions about the FF.

That's kinda my point. While I know more than the Average Joe out there, I just sort of have a vague, cursory knowledge of the franchise, based on their comic appearances (Spider-Man, Ultimate FF, ect) toy line, shows, general interaction with fans and, yes, the movies. So I am sure that I have wrong conceptions about the franchise. I was just giving my view on what it looks like. I'm sure there's a lot more to it than that, if only because you and KA say so. Y'all have read it, I haven't. I trust you guys.

But even though my generalizations are wrong, I'm probably closer to what the average fan thinks. :/ http://ourvaluedcustomers.blogspot.com/2014/02/regarding-her-friends-complaining-about.html

Edited by TM2 Dinobot
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My impression reading thoughts elsewhere is that a lot of casual fans do feel the way you do TM2, as apparently lots of comic movie fans have never read FF, and if they did, it probably wasn't the classic stuff. But undeadpool is right--they had dated comics, but so did the Avengers, X-Men, Spider-Man, Hulk, and DC. . .oh, DC. DC's comics through the mid-60s or so were pretty freakin' bad across the board. Fantastic Four reads like a great Hemingway novel next to those. But the Lee/Kirby stuff had heart, humor, and charm, as did the bulk of the earliest Marvel stuff. The characters were totally likable in the best way! And that run was the origin point of some of the most iconic characters and situations in the history of Marvel--Doom, the Skrulls, the Kree, Silver Surfer, Galactus, the Watcher, the Inhumans, modern Namor, and of course, the Yancy Street Gang. The John Byrne run hearkened back to the spirit of the early comics, focusing on the family dynamics and mystery, action, and excitement. He was clearly reveling in the joy of writing a comic book where there were no real limits to what he could do.

Maybe I'm naive to think that that stuff is universal, but I really think what Marvel Studios has done is tap into the essence of classic Marvel--embodied, and perhaps personified best by the Fantastic Four. What Iron Man and Avengers were? That's what Fantastic Four should be like on the big screen. Not half-assed comedy from the Director of Barber Shop, not the joyless convoluted mess of Man of Steel, but what Guardians of the Galaxy seems to be. And as I think has been proven pretty well, audiences do want that kind of thing.

Edited by karamazov80
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My impression reading thoughts elsewhere is that a lot of casual fans do feel the way you do TM2, as apparently lots of comic movie fans have never read FF, and if they did, it probably wasn't the classic stuff. But undeadpool is right--they had dated comics, but so did the Avengers, X-Men, Spider-Man, Hulk, and DC. . .oh, DC. DC's comics through the mid-60s or so were pretty freakin' bad across the board. Fantastic Four reads like a great Hemingway novel next to those. But the Lee/Kirby stuff had heart, humor, and charm, as did the bulk of the earliest Marvel stuff. The characters were totally likable in the best way! And that run was the origin point of some of the most iconic characters and situations in the history of Marvel--Doom, the Skrulls, the Kree, Silver Surfer, Galactus, the Watcher, the Inhumans, modern Namor, and of course, the Yancy Street Gang. The John Byrne run hearkened back to the spirit of the early comics, focusing on the family dynamics and mystery, action, and excitement. He was clearly reveling in the joy of writing a comic book where there were no real limits to what he could do.

Maybe I'm naive to think that that stuff is universal, but I really think what Marvel Studios has done is tap into the essence of classic Marvel--embodied, and perhaps personified best by the Fantastic Four. What Iron Man and Avengers were? That's what Fantastic Four should be like on the big screen. Not half-assed comedy from the Director of Barber Shop, not the joyless convoluted mess of Man of Steel, but what Guardians of the Galaxy seems to be. And as I think has been proven pretty well, audiences do want that kind of thing.

We need a "Post of the Day" and this needs to be it.

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